Wedding Ceremony Traditions

Here are some beautiful ways to add something special to your wedding ceremony.

Breaking the Glass Ceremony

The breaking of the glass at the end of a wedding ceremony serves to remind of two very important aspects of a marriage. The bride and groom – and everyone – should consider these marriage vows as an IRREVOCABLE ACT – just as permanent and final as the breaking of this glass is unchangeable.  But the breaking of the glass also is a warning of the FRAILTY of a marriage. That sometimes a single thoughtless act, breech of trust, or infidelity can damage a marriage in ways that are very difficult to undo – just as it would be so difficult to undo the breaking of this glass.

Knowing that this marriage is permanent, the bride and groom should strive to show each other the love and respect befitting their spouse and love of their life.

Questions of Intention / Wedding Vows

Will you please, as an expression that your hearts are joined together in love, now join your hands.

[Groom’s name], do you take [Bride’s name] to be your wedded wife, to live together in marriage.
Do you promise to love her, comfort her, honor and keep her
For better or worse, for richer or poorer, in sickness and health
And forsaking all others, be faithful only to her.
So long as you both shall live?
[Groom’s name]: “I do”

[Bride’s name], do you take [Groom’s name] to be your wedded husband to live together in marriage
Do you promise to love him, comfort him, honor and keep him
For better or worse, for richer or poorer, in sickness and health
And forsaking all others, be faithful only to him
So long as you both shall live?
[Bride’s name]: “ I do”

Hands of the Bride and Groom

[Bride’s name], please face [Groom’s name], and hold his hands, palms up, so you may see the gift that they are to you.
These are the hands of your best friend, young and strong and vibrant with love, that are holding yours on your
wedding day, as he promises to love you all the days of his life.
These are the hands that will work along side yours, as together you build your future, as you laugh and cry, as you share your innermost secrets and dreams.
These are the hands you will place with expectant joy against your stomach, until he too, feels his child stir within you.
These are the hands that look so large and strong, yet will be so gentle as he holds your baby for the first time.
These are the hands that will work long hours for you and your new family
These are that hands that will passionately love you and cherish you through the years, for a lifetime of happiness.
These are the hands that will countless times wipe the tears from your eyes: tears of sorrow and tears of joy
These are the hands that will comfort you in illness, and hold you when fear or grief wrack your mind.
These are the hands that will tenderly lift your chin and brush your cheek as they raise your face to look into his eyes: eyes that are filled completely with his overwhelming love and desire for you.
Groom’s name], please hold [Bride’s name]’s hands, palms up, where you may see the gift that they are to you.
These are the hands of your best friend, smooth, young and carefree, that are holding yours on your wedding day, as she pledges her love and commitment to you all the days of her life.
These are the hands that will hold each child in tender love, soothing them through illness and hurt, supporting and encouraging them along the way, and knowing when it is time to let go
These are the hands that will massage tension from you neck and back in the evenings after you’ve both had a long hard day.
These are the hands that will hold you tight as you struggle through difficult times
These are the hands that will comfort you when you are sick, or console you when you are grieving.
They are the hands that will passionately love you and cherish you through the years, for a lifetime of happiness.
These are the hands that will hold you in joy and excitement and hope, each time she tells you that you are to have another child, that together you have created a new life.
These are the hands that will give you support as she encourages you to chase down your dreams. Together as a team, everything you wish for can be realized.

Minister:
God, bless these hands that you see before you this day.  May they always be held by one another. Give them the strength to hold on during the storms of stress and the dark of disillusionment. Keep them tender and gentle as they nurture each other in their wondrous love. Help these hands to continue building a relationship founded in your grace, rich in caring, and devoted in reaching for your perfection. May [Groom’s name] and [Bride’s name] see their four hands as healer, protector, shelter and guide.

We ask this in your name, Amen.

Rose Ceremony

In the Rose Ceremony, the Bride and Groom give each other a Rose. Two roses are all that is necessary. The Rose Ceremony is held at the end of the ceremony just before being pronounced husband and wife. In the old language of flowers, a single red rose always meant “I love you”. The Rose ceremony gives recognition to the new and most honorable title of “Husband and Wife”.

Your gift to each other for your wedding today has been your wedding rings – which shall always be an outward demonstration of your vows of love and respect; and a public showing of your commitment to each other.
You now have what remains the most honorable title which may exist between a man and a woman – the title of “husband” and “wife.” For your first gift as husband and wife, that gift will be a single rose.

In the past, the rose was considered a symbol of love and a single rose always meant only one thing – it meant the words “I love you.” So it is appropriate that for your first gift – as husband and wife – that gift would be a single rose.

Please exchange your first gift as husband and wife. In someways it seems like you have not done anything at all. Just a moment ago you were holding one small rose – and now you are holding one small rose.  In some ways, a marriage ceremony is like this. In some ways, tomorrow is going to seem no different than yesterday. But in fact today, just now, you both have given and received one of the most valuable and precious gifts of life – one I hope you always remember – the gift of true and abiding love within the devotion of marriage.

_________ and _____________, I would ask that where ever you make your home in the future – whether it be a large and elegant home – or a small and graceful one – that you both pick one very special location for roses; so that on each anniversary of this truly wonderful occasion you both may take a rose to that spot both as a recommitment to your marriage – and a recommitment that THIS will be a marriage based upon love.
In every marriage there are times where it is difficult to find the right words.  It is easiest to hurt who we most love. It is easiest to be most hurt by who we most love. It might be difficult some time to words to say “I am sorry” or “I forgive you”; “I need you” or “I am hurting”. If this should happen, if you simply can not find these words, leave a rose at that spot which both of you have selected – for that rose than says what matters most of all and should overpower all other things and all other words.

That rose says the words: “I still love you.” The other should accept this rose for the words which can not be found, and remember the love and hope that you both share today.

__________ and ________, if there is anything you remember of this marriage ceremony, it is that it was love that brought you here today, it is only love which can make it a glorious union, and it is by love which your marriage shall endure.”

Celebration Of Marriage

Marriage is a supreme sharing of experience, and an adventure in the most intimate of human relationships. It is the joyous union of two people whose comradeship and mutual understanding have flowered in romance.

Today  ___________ and__________ proclaim their love and commitment to the world, and we gather here to rejoice, with and for them, in the new life they now undertake together. The joy we feel now is a solemn joy, because the act of marriage has many consequences, both social and personal. Marriage requires “love,” a word we often use with vagueness and sentimentality. We may assume that love is some rare and mystical event, when in fact it is our natural state of being.

So what do we mean by love?  When we love, we see things other people do not see. We see beneath the surface, to the qualities which make our beloved special and unique. To see with loving eyes, is to know inner beauty. And to be loved is to be seen, and known, as we are known to no other. One who loves us, gives us a unique gift: a piece of ourselves, but a piece that only they could give us.

We who love, can look at each other’s life and say, “I touched his life,” or, “I touched her life,” just as an artist might say, “I touched this canvas.” “Those brushstrokes in the comer of this magnificent mural, those are mine. I was a part of this life, and it is a part of me.” Marriage is to belong to each other through a unique and diverse collaboration, like two threads crossing in different directions, yet weaving one tapestry together.

The secret of love and marriage is similar to that of religion itself. It is the emergence of the larger self. It is the finding of one’s life by losing it. Such is the privilege of husband and wife – to be each himself, herself and yet another; to face the world strong, with the courage of two. To make this relationship work, therefore, takes more than love. It takes trust, to know in your hearts that you want only the best for each other. It takes dedication, to stay open to one another, to learn and grow, even when it is difficult to do so. And it takes faith, to go forward together without knowing what the future holds for you both. While love is our natural state of being, these other qualities are not as easy to come by.

They are not a destination, but a journey. The true art of married life is in this an inner spiritual journey. It is a mutual enrichment, a give and take between two personalities, a mingling of two endowments which diminishes neither, but enhances both.

Unity Candle Ceremony

___________________ and ________________ the two lighted candies symbolize your separate lives, your separate families and your separate sets of friends.  I ask that you each take one candle and that together you light the center candle. The individual candies represent your individual lives before today.  Lighting the center candle represents that your two lives are now joined to one light, and represents the joining together of your two families and sets of friends to one.”

If Children Are Involved

“The lighting of the center candle represents not only the union of ____________ and ___________ in marriage, but the unity formed in this new family in which your lives will now shine as one family.

Pastor:
And now, let us participate in another symbolic act. Life is full of many such actions that speak to us of a deeper meaning that we cannot always put into words. You have used ancient symbols in this wedding service—the exchange of rings, the clasping of hands, the bearing of flowers. By such things you act instead of speak in regard to your promises. Now each of you will take a candle. And together you will light one larger candle. This is a vivid reminder that in true Christian marriage our lives are merged, even as we remain individuals.This is a symbolic prayer that God will enhance your own personhood and bless your uniqueness as individuals: but that God will also make of your hands ONE hand…of your hearts ONE heart…and of your lives ONE life.

Wedding Ceremony Readings

A beautiful collection of wedding ceremony readings perfect for your special day.

Reading 1

You are now taking into your care and keeping the happiness of the one person in all the world whom you love best. You are adding to your life not only the affection of each other, but also the companionship and blessing of a deep trust as well. You are agreeing to share strength, responsibilities and to share love.

Reading 2

What greater thing is there for two human souls than to feel that they are joined for life, to strengthen each other in all labor, to rest on each other in sorrow, to minister to each other in all pain, to be with each other in silent unspeakable memories at the moment of the last parting?
– George Eliot

Reading 3

I should like at this time, to try to speak of some of the things which many of us wish for the both of you. We wish for you a home, not a place of stone and wood, but an island of peace, a place from which you will receive strength and support that stays and carries with you throughout your daily lives. We hope that your home encompasses the beauty of nature, that has within it the elements of simplicity, beauty, silence, and colour, in concordance with your dreams and aspirations. We wish for you a home of books, poetry and music, a home with all the things which represent the highest of both men and women.

Reading 4

Marriage is the most important of all earthly relationships. It should be entered into reverently, thoughtfully and with full understanding of its sacred nature. Marriage is a gift of God, given to comfort the sorrow of life and magnify the joys.

Reading 5

Love is always patient and kind, it is never jealous, love is never boastful or conceited, it is never rude or selfish, it does not take offense, and is not resentful. Love takes no pleasures in other people’s sins but delights in the truth, it is always ready to excuse, to trust, to hope, and to endure whatever comes. Love does not come to an end.

Reading 6

Marriage is the clasping of hands, the blending of hearts, the union of two lives as one. Your marriage must stand, not by the authority of the state nor by the words of the minister, but by the strength of your love and the power of faith in each other and in God.

Reading 7

It should never be said of either of you that you show more concern for a friend than you do for each other. More kindness, gentleness, and concern needs to be shown in the privacy of your own home than anywhere else. Indeed, your home should be a haven from all the confusion and craziness the world will create. And faith fullness to each other in every way is the primary ingredient that will keep all those aforementioned virtues in order and produce the joy you seek at this altar.

Reading 8

May this man and this woman be a blessing and comfort to each other, sharers of each their dreams, consoler to each others sorrows, helpers to each other in all life’s vicissitudes. May they encourage each other in what ever they set out to achieve. May they trust each other, trust life and be unafraid. May they love each other and offer love

Reading 9

May your marriage bring you all of the exquisite excitement a marriage should bring. And may life grant you also patience, tolerance, and understanding.

Reading 10

Marriage is not only a commitment between lovers, it is also an agreement between two friends. Allow each other time to be an individual, respect each other’s wishes as well as their dreams.

Reading 11

(Name) and (Name) nothing is easier than saying words and nothing is harder than living them day after day after day. What you promise today, must be renewed and decided again tomorrow, and tomorrow after that and the tomorrow after that.

Reading 12

Marriage is for more than an exchange of vows. It is the foundation of the family, mankind’s basic unit of society, the hope of the world and the strength of our country. It is the relationship between ourselves and the generations to follow.

Reading 13

A marriage which really works is one which works for others. Marriage has both a private face and a public importance. If we solved all our economic problems and failed to build loving families, it would profit us nothing, because the family is the place where the future is created good and full of love—or deformed.

Reading 14

Those who are married live happily ever after the wedding day if they persevere in the real adventure which is the royal task of creating each other and creating a more loving world. This is true of every man and every woman undertaking marriage.

Reading 15

(Name) and (Name), you are about to make promises to one another. Today, these vows are beautiful words representing even more beautiful intentions. But you will find that as you live these vows over the years, investing your time an d your love and your commitment to one another, the happy times of your life will be twice as joyous, because there will be someone to share those joy with. And when life gets tough, it will only be half as bad, because there will be someone by your side to help carry the burden. For those times when life presents all of us with challenges, I would like to offer you the serenity prayer to remember: God grant me the serenity to accept the things that I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

Wedding Anniversary Invitation Wording

Here we have put together a collection of wedding anniversary invitation wording examples for you.

VERSION 1

In honor of the
(Anniversary Year) Wedding Anniversary of
(Husband’s Name) and (Wife’s Name)
their children and grandchildren
request the pleasure of your company
_____________________________
at (Location of Celebration)
on (Date of Celebration)
at (Time of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)

VERSION 2

________________________
Because you have played
such an important part in their lives
please join us for
a (Anniversary Year) Wedding Anniversary
in honor of our parents
(Husband’s Name) and (Wife’s Name)
on (Date of Celebration)
at (Time of Celebration)
(Location of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)

VERSION 3

Through joy and through tears
they’ve remained these (Anniversary Year) years
a precious treasure to one another
sharing a love like no other.
____________________________
The children of
(Husband’s Name) and (Wife’s Name)
invite you to an Anniversary Celebration
(Date of Celebration) at (Time of Celebration)
(Location of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)

VERSION 4

____________________
You’re invited to celebrate
(Number of Years) Years of Love!
At a formal dinner party
for (Husband’s Name) and (Wife’s Name)
(Date of Celebration)
at (Time of Celebration)
(Location of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)

VERSION 5

______________________
Please join us for an evening of
champagne and music
as our parents;
(Husband’s Name) and (Wife’s Name)
celebrate their
(Anniversary Year) Wedding Anniversary
On (Date of Celebration)
At (Location of Celebration)
(Time of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)

VERSION 6

_______________________
Because you have shared in their lives
by your friendship and love
we invite you to join
in the celebration of the
(Anniversary Year) Wedding Anniversary
of our parents
(Husband’s Name) and (Wife’s name)
on (Date of Celebration)
at (Time of Celebration)
(Location of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)
Please bring a memory to share

VERSION 7

_____________________________
Please join our family
on this joyous occasion
when our parents
(Husband’s Name) and (Wife’s Name)
celebrate (Number of Years) years of marriage
at a celebration in their honor
on (Date of Celebration)
at (Time of Celebration)
(Location of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)

VERSION 8

It is truly a test of love
when (Number of Years) years
come and go, and two
people wake each morning
as though it were the first…
____________________________
Please be our guest
to celebrate our (Anniversary Year) year anniversary
on (Date of Celebration)
(Time of Celebration)
(Location of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)
(Wife’s Names) and (Husband’s Name)

VERSION 9

____________________________
Two flames still aglow
after (Number of Years) years
(Husband) & (Wife’s Names)
will celebrate the anniversary
of their years together
on (Date of Celebration)
at (Time of Celebration)
(Location of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Names)
Your presence is gift enough!

VERSION 10

Marriage is like a garden…
with love and tender attention
it will flourish with abundant beauty
To celebrate our
(Number of Years) years of marriage
and the love that has continued
to blossom
_____________________________
we invite you to join us for
Cocktails, Dinner and Dancing
on (Date of Celebration) at (Time of Celebration)
at the (Location of Celebration)
Regrets only (Date and Contact Numbers)

VERSION 11

The same words, the same hearts
but wiser, somehow
The same vows, the same faith
but deeper, now
As we turn to each other
again, we are sure
Love doesn’t wait, it gets better
________________________________
We would like you to share
in the renewal of our vows
on (Date of Celebration)
(Location of Celebration)
(Time of Celebration)
Close this window
Brunch immediately following ceremony
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)
(Husband) and (Wife’s Names)

VERSION 12

Together they have
found a friendship,
raised a family,
and built a beautiful marriage.
_____________________________
You are most warmly invited
by the children of
(Husband) & (Wife’s Names )
to participate
in the joyous celebration
of their parents’
(Anniversary Year) Wedding Anniversary
A Dinner event will be held
on (Date of Celebration)
at (Time of Celebration)
(Location of Celebration)
RSVP (Date and Contact Numbers)

Traditional Wedding Vows

Here is a collection of traditional wedding vows sure to suit everyones wedding ceremony format.

Buddhist
A homily used in Buddhist weddings:
“In the future, happy occasions will come as surely as the morning. Difficult times will come as surely as the night.
When things go joyously, meditate according to the Buddhist tradition. When things go badly, meditate. Meditation in
the manner of the Compassionate Buddha will guide your life. To say the words ‘love and compassion’ is easy. But to
accept that love and compassion are built upon patience and perseverance is not easy.”
Catholic Variation 1
“I, _______, take you, ________, for my lawful wife/husband, to have and to hold, from this day forward, for better,
for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and health, until death do us part.”
Catholic Variation 2
“I, _______, take you, ________, to be my husband/wife. I promise to be true to you in good times and in bad, in
sickness and in health. I will love and honor you all the days of my life.”
Carpatho-Russian Orthodox
Although most Eastern Orthodox wedding ceremonies have silently spoken vows, this sect of the Eastern Orthodox
Church allows brides and groom to speak their vows aloud.
“I, ______, take you, ______, as my wedded wife/husband and I promise to love, honor and respect; to be faithful to
you, and not to forsake you until death do us part. So help me God, one in the Holy Trinity, and all the Saints.”
Civil Ceremony Vows
Here is an example of a standard civil ceremony phrasing of vows. There are several variations.
“_______, I take you to be my lawfully wedded husband/wife. Before these witnesses I vow to love you and care for
you as long as we both shall live. I take you with all your faults and your strengths as I offer myself to you with my
faults and strengths. I will help you when you need help, and I will turn to you when I need help. I choose you as the
person with whom I will spend my life.”
Eastern Orthodox
Both Greek and Russian Orthodox churches have vows that are spoken silently during the ceremony. The ceremony is
a long one that usually includes the Exchange of Rings. The bride and the groom exchange rings three times to
symbolize the Holy Trinity. At another point in the ceremony is the crowning during which the bride and groom receive
crowns on their heads. When the priest removes the crowns and says the blessing, “Be though magnified, O
bridegroom,” the couple is at that moment married.
Episcopalian Variation 1
“In the name of God, I, __________, take you, ________ to be my husband/wife, to have and to hold from this day
forward, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, until we are
parted by death. This is my solemn vow.”
Episcopalian Variation 2
“I, _________, take thee, _______, to be my wedded husband/wife, to have and to hold from this day forward, for
better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death do us part, and
according to God’s holy ordinance, and thereto I plight/give thee my troth.”
Interfaith
“I, _____, take you, to be my wife/husband. I promise to be true to you in good times and in bad, in sickness and in
health. I will love and honor you all the days of my life.”
Jewish
There are differences in vows between the Orthodox, Conservative and Reform branches of Judaism. In many cases,
rabbis and synagogues use their own interpretations. In many Jewish weddings, the vows are recited as the groom
puts the ring on the bride’s finger, or during a double-ring ceremony.
The groom says, “Harey at mekuddeshet li B’taba’at zo k’dat Moshe V’israel.” (“Behold, thou are consecrated unto me
with this ring according to the law of Moses and of Israel.” Transliterations may vary.) The groom then places the ring
on the bride’s finger.
If there is an exchange of rings, the bride says a slightly different vow, with changes made for gender, as she places
the ring on the groom’s finger.
In some Conservative Jewish wedding ceremonies, these vows from the Rabbinical Assembly Manual are used:
Rabbi (addressing the groom): “Do you _____, take _____ to be your lawful wedded wife, to love, to honor and to
cherish?”
Groom says, “I do.”
Rabbi (to the bride): “Do you, _____, take _____, to be your lawful wedded husband to love, to honor and to
cherish?”
Bride says, “I do.”
Rabbi, to the groom: “Do you, _____, put this ring upon the finger of your bride and say to her, ‘Be thou consecrated
to me, as my wife, by this ring, according to the Law of Moses and of Israel?”
Then the Rabbi asks the bride to repeat:
“May this ring I receive from thee be a token of my having become thy wife according to the Law of Moses and of
Israel.”
In a double ring ceremony, the bride says this:
“This ring is a symbol that thou art my husband in accordance with the Law of Moses and Israel.”
The Rabbi in a Reformed Jewish wedding might say these question-and-answer vows:
“O God, supremely blessed, supreme in might and glory, guide and bless this groom and bride. Standing here in the
presence of God, the Guardian of the home, ready to enter into the bond of wedlock, answer in the fear of God, and
in the hearing of those assembled:
“Do you, _____, of your own free will and consent take _____ to be your wife/husband and do you promise to love,
honor and cherish her/him throughout life?”
Groom/bride say, “I do.”
Lutheran Variation 1
There are many types of Lutheran churches in the United States, some more formal than others. Here is an example
of one of the traditionally-used phrasings for vows.
“I take you, _____, to be my husband/wife from this day forward, to join with you and share all that is to come, and I
promise to be faithful to you until death parts us.”
Lutheran Variation 2
“I, _____, take you, _____, to be my husband/wife, and these things I promise you:
I will be faithful to you and honest with you;
I will respect, trust, help and care for you;
I will share my life with you;
I will forgive you as we have been forgiven;
And I will try with you better to understand ourselves,
the world, and God;
Through the best and the worst of what is to come as long as we live.”
Methodist
“In the name of God, I, ______, take you, ______, to be my husband/wife, to have and to hold from this day
forward, for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, until we are
parted by death. This is my solemn vow.”
Muslim
Bride: “I, _________, offer you in myself in marriage in accordance with the instructions of the Holy Quar’an and the
Holy Prophet, peace and blessing be upon Him. I pledge, in honesty and with sincerity, to be for you an obedient and
faithful wife.”
Groom: “I pledge, in honesty and sincerity, to be for you a faithful and helpful husband.”
Native American (Apache)
Here is the blessing of the Apaches used in wedding ceremonies:
“Now you will feel no rain, for each of you will be shelter for the other. Now you will feel no cold, for each of you will
be warmth to the other. Now there will be no loneliness, for each of you will be companion to the other. Now you are
two persons, but there is only one life before you. May beauty surround you both in the journey ahead and through
all the years. May happiness be your companion and your days together be good and long upon the earth.”
“Treat yourselves and each other with respect, and remind yourselves often of what brought you together. Give the
highest priority to the tenderness, gentleness and kindness that your connection deserves. When frustration,
difficulties and fear assail your relationship, as they threaten all relationships at one time or another, remember to
focus on what is right between you, not only the part which seems wrong. In this way, you can ride out the storms
when clouds hide the face of the sun in your lives — remembering that even if you lose sight of it for a moment, the
sun is still there. And if each of you takes responsibility for the quality of your life together, it will be marked by
abundance and delight.”
Native American (Cherokee)
“God in heaven above please protect the ones we love. We honor all you created as we pledge our hearts and lives
together. We honor Mother Earth and ask for our marriage to be abundant and grow stronger through the seasons.
We honor fire and ask that our union be warm and glowing with love in our hearts. We honor wind and ask that we
sail through life safe and calm as in our father’s arms. We honor water to clean and soothe our relationship — that it
may never thirst for love. With all the forces of the universe you created, we pray for harmony as we grow forever
young together. Amen.”
Non-Denominational Protestant Variation 1
There are many Protestant churches throughout America that don’t have an affiliation with a specific denomination.
Here are some examples of traditional nondenominational vows:
The minister says: “Will you have this woman to be your wedded wife, to live together in holy matrimony? Will you
love her, comfort her, honor and keep her in sickness and in health, in sorrow and in joy, and forsaking all others, be
faithful to her as long as you both shall live?”
The groom answers: “I do.”
The vows are then repeated for the bride.
Or, the minister makes this statement:
“This celebration is an outward token of a sacred and inward union of the hearts which the Church does bless and the
State makes legal — a union created by loving purpose and kept by abiding will.”
The minister then asks the bride and groom:
“Is it in this spirit and for this purpose that you have come here to be joined together?”
The bride and groom reply:
“Yes, I have.”
The couple says these vows from memory or repeats after the officiant:
“I take you to be my wedded wife/husband, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better, for worse, for
richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death do us part. This is my solemn vow.
According to God’s holy ordinance; and thereto I plight you my troth.”
Non-Denominational Protestant Variation 2
“I, _____, take thee, _____, to be my wedded husband/wife, to have and to hold, from this day forward, for better,
for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death do us part, according to
God’s holy ordinance: and thereto I pledge thee my faith
Non-Denominational Protestant Variation 3
Minister says to the groom: “_____, wilt thou have ____ to be thy wedded wife, to live together after God’s
ordinance, in the holy estate of matrimony? Wilt thou love her, comfort her, honor and keep her, in sickness and in
health; and forsaking all others, keep thee only unto her, so long as ye both shall live?”
Groom says, “I will.”
Then Minister says to the bride: “______, wilt thou have _____ to be thy wedded husband, to live together after
God’s ordinance, in the holy estate of matrimony? Wilt thou obey him, and serve him, love, honor and keep him, in
sickness and in health, and, forsaking all others, keep thee only unto him, so long as ye both shall live?”
Bride says, “I will.”
Non-Denominational Protestant Variation 4
The minister says to the groom: “_____, will you take _____ to be your wedded wife, to live together after God’s
ordinance in the holy relationship of marriage? Will you love her, comfort her, honor and cherish her in sickness and in
health, be true and loyal to her, as long as you both shall live?”
The groom answers, “I will.”
Then, the minister addresses the bride: “_____, will you take _____ to be your wedded husband, to live together
after God’s ordinance in the holy relationship of marriage? Will you love, honor and cherish him in sickness and in
health, be true and loyal to him, as long as you both shall live?”
The bride answers, “I will.”
When reciting the following nondenominational Protestant vows, the bride and groom hold right hands, face each
other and repeat after the officiant:
Groom: “_____, I now take you to be my wedded wife, to live together after God’s ordinance in the holy relationship
of marriage. I promise to love and comfort you, honor and keep you, and forsaking all others, I will be yours alone as
long as we both shall live.”
Bride: “_____, I now take you to be my wedded husband, to live together after God’s ordinance in the holy
relationship of marriage. I promise to love you and obey you, honor and keep you, and forsaking all others, I will be
yours alone as long as we both shall live.”
(If you do not want to use the word “obey,” discuss it with your minister.)
These are just some of the vows used in nondenominational Protestant wedding ceremonies. There are others.
Presbyterian
“I, ______, take you to be my wedded wife/husband, and I do promise and covenant, before God and these
witnesses, to be your loving and faithful wife/husband, in plenty and in want, in joy and in sorrow, in sickness and in
health, as long as we both shall live.”
Unitarian
Although most Unitarian weddings do not follow a set service, but rather are designed by individual ministers, here
are two typical Unitarian-Universalist wedding vow phrasings:
The minister asks the bride and the groom respectively:
“_____, will you take _____ to be your husband/wife; love, honor and cherish him/her now and forevermore?”
The bride and groom answer:
“I will.”
The minister then asks bride and groom to repeat:
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“I, _______, take you, _____, to be my husband/wife; to have and to hold from this day forward, for better, for
worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and cherish always.”
“________, will you have ______ to be your husband/wife, to live together in creating an abiding marriage? Will you
love and honor, comfort and cherish him/her in sickness and in health, in sorrow and in joy, from this day forward?”
United Church of Christ
“I, _____, take you, ______, to be my husband/wife, and I promise to love and sustain you in the bonds of marriage
from this day forward, in sickness and in health, in plenty and in want, in joy and in sorrow, till death shall part us,
according to God’s holy ordinance.”
Quaker
“In the presence of God and these our Friends, I take thee to be my wife/husband, promising with Divine assistance
to be unto thee a loving and faithful wife/husband as long as we both shall live.”

Save The Date Wedding Card Wording

A perfect collection of wonderful way to let your guests know an invitation to your wedding celebration will follow
shortly.

VERSION 1

Please save the date of
(Date of the wedding)
for our wedding
Invitation and details to follow
(Bride and Groom’s Names)

VERSION 2

A date to remember!
(Date of the wedding)
Please save the date
for the wedding of
(Bride and Groom’s Names)
In (Location of the Wedding)
Invitation to follow

VERSION 3

Times are busy and calendars are full
(Bride’s Name)
and
(Groom’s Name)
want you to know
they are planning their wedding for
(Date of the Wedding)
in (Location of the Wedding)
Invitations to follow

VERSION 4

Please Save the Date!
We will be getting married
on (Date of the Wedding)
Invitation and details to follow
(Bride and Groom’s Names)

VERSION 5

Save the date!
(Bride and Groom’s Names)
will be getting married on
(Date of the wedding)
(Location of the wedding)
Formal invitation to follow

VERSION 6

We are delighted to announce
that on (Date of the Wedding) in (Location of the Wedding)
(Bride and Grooms’ Names)
are getting married!
Please make sure to save this date
We hope that you will be able to share in
our special day of joy and celebration
Sincerely,
(Bride’s Parents Names)
Formal invitation to follow

VERSION 7

Please save the date.
We will be getting married on
(Date of the wedding)
at (Location of the wedding)
Invitation and Details to follow
(Bride and Groom’s Names)

VERSION 8

Please save the date,
Sure it’s been a long wait
We wanted to be sure,
And it’s been worth waiting for
(Date of the wedding)
(Location of the wedding)
Invitation and Details to follow
(Bride and Groom’s Names)

VERSION 9

(Bride’s Parents Names)
look forward to celebrating with you
at their daughter’s wedding
on (Date of the Wedding)
in (Location of the Wedding)
Invitation and itinerary to follow

VERSION 10

Save the Date
Join us for the
Wedding Weekend
of
(Bride and Groom’s Names)
The festivities begin on (commencement date)
ending (finish date)
Accommodation is being held at the
(Accommodation name)
Please call (phone no of accommodation)
Let them know that you are with the
(Bride and Groom’s Names) wedding
Looking forward to seeing you there
(Bride and Groom’s Names)